R. J. Rosenberg Orthopedic Lab, Inc.
Specializing in upper limb and lower limb prosthetics and silicone restoration since 1980.

News & Events

R.J. Rosenberg Patient is “Fairy Godmother” to Local Down Syndrome Woman who Wants to be a Mail Carrier

Thanks to LOCAL 12, WKRC-TV for this wonderful story on a local woman who wants to be a mail carrier. We are thrilled that one of Ryan Spill‘s patients Melissa Tilton is featured, she is an upper extremity amputee and was Grace’s fairy godmother, taking her on her mail route. ❤️ to all involved!

Click Here to watch the video!

22nd annual Golf Clinic A Treat for All

R.J. Rosenberg Orthopedic Lab and Winton Woods were thrilled to have their 22nd annual free instructional golf clinic for people with disabilities Fri., June 7, at Meadow Links & Golf Academy Driving Range at Winton Woods.

We had over 50 attendees including physical therapists, rehabilitation professionals, golf instructors, and people with physical disabilities who learned about adaptive golf techniques and equipment.

“Golf is one of the most adaptable sports available,” said Ryan Spill, CP/L of R.J. Rosenberg Orthopedic Lab. “Almost everyone, regardless of disability, can participate and enjoy the benefits golf has to offer, such as increased flexibility, improved balance, fresh-air exercise, and camaraderie.”

We hope everyone had a fantastic time and Ryan, Katie, Keiko, Tammy, Bob, Kelsey, Linda, and Denise will welcome all back again next June.

22nd annual Golf Clinic A Treat for All
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Call R.J. Rosenberg Orthopedic Lab (513) 221-7200 to register for the Golf Clinic today!
RJ Rosenberg Golf Clinic 2019
Run, Reuben, Run! (thanks to Reuben for sharing this video with us)

25 seconds of pure awesomeness featuring Reuben and his young son, Braxton! Several months ago he stated, “I have no problem walking at a moderate pace, but my main goal is to run.” Ryan Spill, CP/LP of R.J. Rosenberg Orthopedic Lab made him the Össur Flex-Run with Nike Sole.

New Hydrostatic Casting Process Available at RJR Advances Socket Comfort

The Symphonie® Aqua System technology from Cypress Adaptive, an advanced socket casting process, is now being used by Ryan Spill, CP, LP of R.J. Rosenberg Orthopedic Lab. Unlike traditional non-weight bearing casting methods where a patient is seated, the Symphonie calls for the patient to stand in a pressurized tank in full weight-bearing mode. Within a few minutes after hydrostatic pressure is applied to the residual limb, the patient’s body weight and tissue contours are transferred perfectly and evenly to the casting material. The new impression accurately reflects the limb under full weight-bearing conditions exactly as it would be inside a prosthetic socket.

The full contact and weight bearing that the patient experiences during the casting process also provides excellent proprioceptive feedback to the patient who can then give the prosthetist valuable information concerning bony and sensitive parts of the limb before the socket is made.

This technique is particularly helpful for patients who have complex residual limbs and amputees who struggle with comfort of their sockets. By improving prosthetic comfort, patients achieve higher mobility and improved quality of life.

For more information, contact us at 513-221-7200.

New Hydrostatic Casting Process Available at Sampsons Advances Socket Comfort
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Skills for Life 5 – a Wealth of Education and Memories for Bilateral Upper Extremity Amputees

Always in search of continuing education and new technology, Ryan Spill, CPO, LPO, attended last week’s Skills for Life 5: Bilateral Upper Limb Loss Workshop in Houston, Texas. Ryan accompanied patient Henry Barnaby who was on the Sepsis Panel. #SkillsforLife5 gave Ryan an opportunity to interact with professionals from across the country including Harold Sears, retired from Motion Control, Inc./Fillauerand Shawn Swanson Johnson, OTR and SSJ Rehab Services, PLLC. The Skills for Life 5 audience was eager to learn about technology such as the DEKA arm from Mobius Bionics, home automation, service animals, life experiences, tips on travel and new ideas. There was a SCUBA experience, cooking demo and exercise program and more, along with many panel discussions. The event took place Oct 18-21 at the The Westin Oaks Houston at the Galleria. If you’d like more information, give Ryan a call at the office 513-221-7200.

Skills for Life 5 – a Wealth of Education and Memories for Bilateral Upper Extremity Amputees
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Golf Clinic a Success, Channel 9 Reports!

What a great day we had for our 21st Annual Instructional Golf Clinic at Meadow Links Golf Course at Winton Woods. Thanks to everyone for making it so successful, fun and enriching.

Watch this clip from Channel 9 (WCPO). Patients of all ages with physical limitations came to try their hand at golf, with specially trained golf pros instructing them and prosthetist Ryan Spill, CP, LP, cheering them on.

Golf is one of the most adaptable sports available. Almost everyone, regardless of disability, can participate and enjoy the benefits it has to offer: increased flexibility, improved balance, fresh-air exercise, and camaraderie.

We hope to see you in 2019 when we host this fun event again!

21st Annual Instructional Golf Clinic at Meadow Links Golf Course at Winton Woods
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Golf Clinic for Disabled Golfers, Instructors Set for June 1

It’s time to tee it up again!  R.J. Rosenberg Orthopedic Lab and Winton Woods are offering a free instructional golf clinic for people with disabilities Friday, June 1, at Meadow Links Golf Course & Academy Driving Range at Winton Woods, 10999 Mill Road, from 10 a.m. to noon, followed by a lunch.

The free clinic is open to physical therapists, rehabilitation professionals, golf instructors, and people with physical disabilities who want to learn about adaptive golf techniques and equipment.

Golf is one of the most adaptable sports available. Almost everyone, regardless of disability, can participate and enjoy the benefits it has to offer: increased flexibility, improved balance, fresh-air exercise, and camaraderie.

Space is limited and registration is required. For more information or to register, call Tammy at R.J. Rosenberg Orthopedic Lab at 513-221-7200.

 Click here to download the flyer

rjr_free_instructional_golf_clinic-min
RJ Rosenberg Orthopedic Lab Hosted a Technology Day Featuring New Zealand Inventor Mathew Jury and His Advanced, Waterproof Robotic Hand

RJ Rosenberg Orthopedic Lab recently held their first Technology Day under the direction of Ryan Spill, CP.

Special guest was New Zealander Mathew Jury, inventor of a new prosthetic, The TASKA Hand. The TASKA Hand allows five-finger movement, wrist flexibility and complete control of movement. It can support up to 44 lbs., it’s waterproof, and can perform even the gentlest of tasks such as lifting an egg out of a carton.

Mathew worked with several of RJ Rosenberg upper-limb amputees to demonstrate what this amazing hand can do.

In addition to the TASKA, another one of our patients who received pattern recognition training from Ryan was able to show how his muscle signals a myoelectric hand to open and close.

For more information about advances in upper-limb prosthetics, contact our office. Also, a reminder to any of our upper and lower limb-los patients who haven’t been in to see us in awhile, it’s always a good idea to schedule a prosthetic check-up, especially if you have gained or lost weight, or if your activity level has changed. We’re here to help you achieve the best mobility and function possible!

RJ Rosenberg Orthopedic Lab Hosted a Technology Day
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A wonderful story to make you smile featuring Ryan Spill andR.J. Rosenberg Orthopedic Lab.

#dogprosthetic #limbloss #dogleg #ampudog #orthodog #Mastiff

Here are some photos from an earlier fitting of Moose.  Just like with their human counterparts, adjustments needed to be made to get Moose’s custom socket and prostheses just right.  He has been a great patient!

http://www.wcpo.com/longform/mooses-story-how-a-150-pound-english-mastiff-got-a-new-leg-on-life

A wonderful story to make you smile featuring Ryan Spill
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Ryan Spill, CPO, and Patient Zack At Amputee Coalition of America Meeting

Ryan Spill attended the Amputee Coalition of America meeting, August 3-5, in Louisville, Kentucky. It’s a great event for amputees to come together to meet peers, learn about new technology and have fun. Ryan brought one of his patients, Zack, to participate in the running clinic. And Ryan stopped at the Coapt booth to talk to attendees. Give Ryan a call to see if there is new technology that is right for you!

2017 RJ Rosenberg Amputee Coalition
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A Very Fun Day at the RJR Golf Clinic

Thanks to everyone at Meadow Links Golf Course & Academy Driving Range at Winton Woods for hosting the 10th anniversary of our free instructional golf clinic for people with disabilities. Friday, June 2, was a great day and the clinic had a great turnout.

Golf is one of the most adaptable sports available. Almost everyone, regardless of disability, can participate and enjoy the benefits it has to offer: increased flexibility, improved balance, fresh-air exercise, and camaraderie.

Enjoy this photo gallery. And we hope to see you next year!

2017 Iowa Golf Event
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Golf Clinic for Disabled Golfers, Instructors Set for June 2

R.J. Rosenberg Orthopedic Lab and Winton Woods are offering a free instructional golf clinic for people with disabilities Friday, June 2, at Meadow Links Golf Course & Academy Driving Range at Winton Woods, 10999 Mill Road, from 10 a.m. to noon, followed by a lunch.

The free clinic is open to physical therapists, rehabilitation professionals, golf instructors, and people with physical disabilities who want to learn about adaptive golf techniques and equipment.

Golf is one of the most adaptable sports available. Almost everyone, regardless of disability, can participate and enjoy the benefits it has to offer: increased flexibility, improved balance, fresh-air exercise, and camaraderie.

Space is limited and registration is required. For more information or to register, call Tammy at R.J. Rosenberg Orthopedic Lab at 513-221-7200.

 Click here to download the flyer

March 1-4, 2017

Practitioners from across the country came together in Chicago for the 43rd Academy Annual Meeting & Scientific Symposium. Ryan Spill, CP, president of R. J. Rosenberg Orthopedic attended the educational sessions and exhibits. Ryan had an opportunity to see new technology, attend seminars and meet with colleagues across the country to share ideas. Check out some of the technology, Ryan got a closer look at and if you have questions on how Ryan and the team at R.J. Rosenberg Orthopedic Lab can help you, call us at 513-221-7200.

43rd Academy Annual Meeting & Scientific Symposium
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The O&P Almanac February issue featured Ryan Spill, CP, president of R.J. Rosenberg. Click to page 44 to read the article.

Ryan Spill volunteers in Haiti: Helping the Physically Challenged

Hurricanes and earthquakes notwithstanding, medical care in Haiti is an ongoing crisis with not enough health care professionals, clinics, or facilities to serve the population. Many Haitians, especially in rural or underdeveloped areas, have come to rely on visiting medical teams to tend to a variety of conditions.

I’m a prosthetist at RJ Rosenberg Orthopedic Lab (RJR) in Cincinnati, that is, I am a clinician who specializes in the science of design and fitting of artificial arms and legs. On Sept. 23, I embarked on my second week-long trip to Port de Paix to volunteer as a prosthetist with STAND, the Haiti Project (standhaitiproject.org). I was one of two prosthetists on the trip, along with 20 physical therapists and two nurse practitioners.

Port de Paix is a small city on the northern coast of the island and is surrounded by rural communities. Homes are very small, usually one story, built from cinder block, and many without glass in the windows. There are no grassy lawns and outdoor furniture is a hard metal chair or two. Most people drive motos (motorcycles), or scooters, and “Uber” consists of old pickup trucks carrying as many passengers as will fit on the bed of the truck.

Although unaffected by the tragic earthquake of 2010 in Port au Prince, the community is largely void of physical medicine and rehabilitative care as we know it in the U.S. Many individuals suffer from chronic pain sustained from conditions that could have easily been treated on our soil. Amputees do not have access to a prosthetic clinic where they can be evaluated for a first prosthesis or receive follow-up care after being fit with one.

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Establishing and maintaining a sustainable clinic to provide physical therapy and prosthetic services is the goal of the nonprofit STAND. In addition to providing care, it’s a training ground for local nursing and prosthetic students who will eventually manage the clinic. Volunteers, such as our group from the states, help staff the clinic three times a year in programs organized by STAND.

The clinic where we saw patients is in a three-story cinder block structure located on the ocean. There is no beach, per se, but a concrete strip. Most of the traffic on it includes feral pigs and dogs, searching for meals at low tide. The clinic includes a basement and outdoor patio for prosthetic and orthotic fabrication and fitting, a first floor, which houses 20 treatment tables for the physical therapists working with those who have various musculoskeletal disorders, a pediatric room, a second floor with men’s and women’s sleeping quarters, and a roof on which 10 of us pitched tents to sleep in.Air conditioning, hot water, and drinkable tap water were not available for us in Port de Paix where temperatures soar into the 90s with high humidity. All of the volunteer clinicians brought their own water bottles, which we refilled sometimes hourly from five-gallon bottles of spring water.

STAND employed several locals from Port de Paix to help run the clinic, clean the facilities daily, and to cook. The cooks provided three meals per day. Breakfast included homemade fruit juices, bananas, and breads served with a delicious, mildly spicy peanut butter. Lunches and dinners included a meat, usually goat, chicken, or seafood with vegetables. Lunch was served around noon, but there was no official lunch hour. We grabbed food when we could during quick breaks.

On the first morning of the clinic, patients needing care formed a line stretching from the front of the building down the street. All 24 clinicians had their first patients at 8 a.m. continuing until 5 p.m., sometimes later. The other prosthetist, Emily Daham from [city], and I had four amputee patients within the first 30 minutes of the clinic, each with different needs, including replacement accessories, socks, shoes, and other parts for their prosthetic limbs. One female, 38 years old, had not been fit with a prosthetic leg above her knee since a motorcycle accident at least one year ago. A 6-year-old boy had outgrown his prosthetic leg a few months before the clinic, but was unable to be seen since the May clinic for a new prosthesis. An elderly woman was in need of a new sleeve that holds her prosthetic leg to her body. A female in her mid-20s came in for replacement cosmetic hose, the outermost layer to her prosthetic leg; her goals were for the best aesthetics possible.

Our “laboratory” was half outside and half inside the facility. Our air compressor was plugged into a gas-powered generator. We did not have most of the hardware and tooling that we use in the states. This forced us to be creative in terms of finding solutions for people; for example, a 9-month-old girl born with a shortened right leg was provided with a stand consisting of a donated ankle brace (coincidentally from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital) mounted to a very thick swimming pool noodle. This stand will prepare her for her first prosthesis, which will be fit next year.

This clinic relies heavily on donated supplies. These donations consist of many over-the-counter medications, shoes (people can’t afford to have several pairs of shoes), and prosthetic arms and legs. The Cincinnati community has been very generous in terms of people donating their old prosthetic devices. One of my patients here at RJR, an 18-year old female, donated all of her old prosthetic legs including those from when she was a young child. The recipients of these donated prosthetic parts don’t get a chance to meet the people who donated them, but the smiles on their faces say it all.

My time in the clinic was spent sweating, drinking water, taking advantage of the cold showers to cool off when I could, and working until dark every day. When people ask me how to describe it, I tell them that it was the hardest week of work that I can’t wait to do again!

Ryan Spill volunteers in Haiti
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